• antiquitatem en Español
  •    
NIHIL NOVUM SUB SOLE

1001 deeds, sayings, curiosities and anecdotes of the ancient world

A bed of roses

Published | 0 Comments

The historical reality and people´s fantasy have made Sybaris a city steeped in luxury and pleasure; Sybarite is the adjective that designates its inhabitants, but the term came to refer to exquisite people with refined tastes or to those who were delivered to the luxury and pleasure.

Read more

The deep caves surprise and attract devout and believer men

Published | 0 Comments

Some natural areas, whether by their hidden beauty, by their silence or by their depth that sink in the bowels of the earth, seem to emanate a strong attraction to humans. Of these places the caves have a special force. Not surprisingly the man dwelt in them during the long night of their childhood as a species.

Read more

Claudia made her wool (Claudia lanam fecit)

Published | 0 Comments

Certainly one of the first achievements of the men was making clothes for weather protection sometimes warm sometimes cold. In oldest archaeological deposits appear bone needles with a hole and slot on one end through which a fiber input, a strip of skin, a thread later. Making yarn of animal hair or wool or vegetable fiber was early and very important. It was a great human work.

Read more

Nothing dries more quickly than a tear

Published | 0 Comments

This Latin phrase, prior Greek, has had remarkable success judging by the frequency with which it is used or cited. His immediate sense seems to refer to how quickly we forget the pain or frustration, whether in body or in spirit, a fact which the evidence seems to deny in many situations.

Read more

What does "leap-year" mean? Where does the term “twice sixth year” come from?

Published | 0 Comments

Translator´s Note that may help English- speaking readers to understand this text better: leap-year in Latin and modern Latin languages is called “bi sextum” year, like “twice sixth” year. This, as you will check later, is essential to be taken into account before starting to read this article in order to be able to understand it properly.

Read more

The couvade

Published | 0 Comments

"Couvade" is a word derived from the French "couvade"; "couver" means “incubate” “brood." This ethnographic term designates a rite of sympathetic magic or formula for newborn recognition of newborn, practiced in some villages at the time of the birth of a son; that is a kind of simulation of birth by the father, who lies in the bed with the baby.

Read more

Lynceus eyes

Published | 0 Comments

“Lynx eyes” is an Spanish phrase (equivalent to "eagle eyes") that applies to a person of view particularly acute or especially clever and insightful understanding, ie. a crafty person.

Read more
Page 10 of 12. Go to:   1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9    10    11    12  
   
Esta web utiliza cookies, puedes ver la política de cookies, aquí Si continuas navegando estás aceptándola
Política de cookies +